A cancer survivor is anyone who has ever been diagnosed with cancer and is living today. Because of major advances in diagnosis and screening as well as better treatment for many types of cancer, many people are living longer with cancer.

Survivorship begins at the time of diagnosis and continues through the remainder of life. Cancer survivors go through different phases which include:
1) Acute phase: when the person is diagnosed and undergoes active treatment,
2) Transitional phase: which follows immediately after completion of treatment;
3) Extended survival: which includes active surveillance and care including dealing with the long-term effects of treatment.

There are more than 3 million breast cancer survivors living in the United States today. More than 85 percent of adults with breast cancer live at least five years beyond their diagnosis. While it’s tragic so many people have had breast cancer, the sheer number of survivors shows the great strides that have been made in early detection and treatment. Today, most breast cancer survivors lead long and fulfilling lives. Susan G. Komen appreciates all of the breast cancer survivors who help to further the Komen promise.

Our Affiliate is involved with survivors in numerous ways throughout the year.

  • Our Survivorship Committee, composed of survivors and other experts in the field, are working on Affiliate-led survivorship initiatives.
  • Engaging our survivor community with surveys and focus groups about their experiences and their needs in order to help guide future Affiliate-driven survivorship activities
  • Planning educational events for survivors.
  • Maintaining a Resource Guide to help survivors improve their quality of life.
  • Connecting patients with information about Survivorship Care Plans.
  • Survivors are encouraged to join us at the Race for Cure  for special recognition and events.

Visit Susan G. Komen’s website for more information:

Life After Treatment
http://ww5.komen.org/LifeAfterTreatment.html

Survivorship Topics
http://ww5.komen.org/BreastCancer/aftertreatment.html